Archive for June, 2003

Party Time

Posted on June 23, 2003, under legacy.

Yesterday I bit the bullet and decided to try and learn how to use the Gimp. I’ve been using Photoshop for years to do the minimal non-creative touchups I’m barely capable of, and just got too lazy to learn a new interface. But, I can definitely recommend Grokking the Gimp, which within a few minutes got me up to speed, and I could finally do some basics like add a drop shadow! The GIMP’s drop shadow is also finer and nicer-looking, to me anyway, than Photoshops. The image at castlerea.stdlib.net was touched up with the Gimp.

For years I’ve been mulling with the idea of Joining a political party. I’ve been involved in politics for a long time, and I was an electoral agent at the last election, but time constraints mean I’d be better off joining a party.

The party that mosts aligns with my own politics is the Greens, but unfortunately I have the rather inconvienent conviction that nuclear power is actually the greenest, safest power source going and we should be there already. So they get tetchy every time I try
to convince them.

Finally got a working ACL compiler for NSD written today, next onwards to the module building!

MarkByte

Posted on June 21, 2003, under legacy.

Today was an intresting day, John (x@rb) mailed me about some DNS changes he needed doing, as he was moving the primary of the Cliste zones, turns out he’d found a very cool hosting company called Bytemark Hosting.

These people are unreal, they offer full Linux UML’s, running Debian, Gentoo or DeadRat for 15 Sterling per month. They come with 3GB of disk space, and a 7.5GB (yes that’s a big B) transfer rate, all uppable by paying a little more.

As if that wasnt enough, they also give you an ssh account on the machine hosting the UML, so you can reboot and restart your server on demand, connect to it’s serial consoles, tell how much bandwidth you’ve used .. and more. Oh, and you set up SMS notification and
automatic actions such as reboots if services suddenly go down.

And if that wasnt enough, the UML kernel they use supports IPv6, and you can get up a 6to4 tunnel without any trouble!

So, needless to say, I ordered one, and set about migrating kilmainham.stdlib.net to the new server, called castlerea.stdlib.net. It took less than an hour, in fact if your reading this on www.stdlib.net, it’s coming from castlerea. Over IPv6 if you support it (shame on you
if you don’t!).

In other purchasing madness, I bought all 3 seasons of Family Guy on DVD from play.com yesterday, can’t wait for them to arrive :)

In nsd related news, looks like the NSD team may implement plugin support, which I’ll be using to implement ACL’s, it’s all working out very nicely indeed :)

As a result of my work on NSD, I now have some useful generic routines for turning strings such as

193.1.219.0/24
193.1.0.0/255.255.0.0
127.0.0.1/8
192.168/16
::1/64
::ffff:169.172.1.2

Into useful network-order binary representations. There are also some macros for doing efficient subnet checks, whether an address is within a subnet, whether a whole subnet lies within another and so on. It’s reasonly good, taking 6 seconds on my 2Ghz laptop to
check every possible IPv4 address against a subnet, it takes 22 to the corresponding ammount of v6 ones. The implementation is relatively foolproof, with all networks being stored in IPv6 format (V4′s get mapped), but there are efficient V4-only tests in
the header.

  • 1
    <a href="/~colmmacc/nsd/subnet.c">subnet.c</a>
  • 1
    <a href="/~colmmacc/nsd/subnet.h">subnet.h</a>