Archive for July, 2006

Daft gone … daft

Posted on July 20, 2006, under general.

I just got an email from DAFT, informing me that they were now Ireland’s busiest website. I normally simply delete marketting e-mail, but this time I was curious to find out how exactly they so accurately surveyed the business of every single Irish website.

Here’s the mail I got from daft:

From: The Daft Team
Date: 20 Jul 2006 20:38:55 -0000
Subject: Thank you for using Daft

Hi Colm, It has just been announced by the ABC that Daft.ie is Ireland’s Busiest Website. We just wanted to say thank you for using Daft especially to anyone who bought a new home on Daft over the last year.

The latest figures show that Daft received requests for over 27 million pages of information in the month of May. The number 2 website is Eircom.net with 22.2 million and number 3 is RTE.ie with 21.7 million.

http://www.daft.ie/news/2006/irelands_busiest_website.daft

As the biggest property website in Ireland, Daft.ie has more property for sale than anyone else. So if any friends or family are looking to buy a house make sure to tell them to check out Daft the number 1 property website.

Thanks,
The Daft Team

Here’s a cache of the link in case it changes.

I’ve mailed to point out that I can find no statement from ABC announcing Daft as Ireland’s busiest website (on their site, they state the much more reasonable “Daft.ie Now Ireland’s Busiest Certified Property Site”), and also to point out that even if they made such a statement, how could they possibly know if it was true or not? daft.ie may well be the top Irish ABC-audited website, but that does not make them “Ireland’s busiest website”.

I don’t know if ftp.heanet.ie can be called a “website” but it’s busier than any of the numbers quoted. I don’t know if boards.ie is ABC-audited, it may well be busier. I don’t think google.ie is ABC-audited, it may well be busier. Either way, the point is, there is simply no way to gauge it, at least not with certainty enough to be able to declare any website the busiest in Ireland (or do they mean the busiest Irish website? who even knows?).

I don’t like this. I don’t like this a lot. Claims such as “Daft.ie Now Ireland’s Busiest Website” should, in my opinion, be backed up and well-defined. At least the ABC report gives me a real-world person to phone and bug about this tomorrow.

How to say my name

Posted on July 17, 2006, under general.

Despite living in a predominantly English-speaking country, between my forename and my surname I have a pain of name for people to pronounce, even for Irish people. I don’t really get hung up about how its pronounced, it’s not a big deal, but enough people keep asking that I might aswell put something online just to make it clear.

The 3 C's

O.k., firstly, my forename, which is all anyone should ever need to call me by. It’s definitely not Colin. Colin is a fine name, for fine people, like … well … Colin, but it’s not my name. Calling me Colin is likely only ever to cause confusion, and after years of working with Colin, I’m hardwired to completely ignore any attempt to address me by it.

My name is “Colm”. There are three ways to pronnounce this name, two of which are common. The uncommon one is the same as the name “Callum”, it’s written as kælm̩ in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and sounds like this. That’s also definitely not my name.

The most common form is written as “kɒlm̩” in the IPA, and sounds like this. My parents say my name this way, so you’re in good company if that’s how it comes out, and I’ll certainly answer to it – but it’s not how most people say my name.

As I’m awkward, and went to an Irish-speaking school, most people use the Irish form of my name, and it’s what I prefer. And it sounds like kʌlm̩. I don’t take offence if it doesn’t come out like that though.

My surname is a whole other problem, as there are multiple valid ways to pronounce it, and even I don’t pronounce it the same way each time. Pretty much any vague mumble will do just fine for that part.

Many thanks to Nóirín for the IPA and the recordings. Oh, and cue the series of “oh I know what I like to call you” comments.